The Day After

Walking into the rabbitry, it’s more quiet than usual. The adults shuffle around and stretch up to greet me and the babies huddle around their moms waiting for the next round of hay.

The three month old mixed breeds are gone, off to what is gently termed “freezer camp”. Six who were born and lived in my care, all who shared the name ‘Dinner’. 

Today, however, is full of activity. The growout cages need to be cleaned and sanitized for the next group of youngsters, a large group of pedigreed NZRs and those mixed breeds bound for freezer camp (FC) in six weeks. Water bottles to be washed, salt licks to be renewed, resting mats to be scrubbed and left in the sunshine, and the little wood shelf to be scraped and sanded. Water splashes on the floor as a wire brush scrapes the crusted calcium from cage floors where the rabbits chose to pee, sending a grey chalky water down the floor drain. 

Inventory is taken–how many bags of pellets are left, how many pounds of oats remain in the 50lb bag, do I need to purchase more hay? I need to buy another canister of flake Old Fashioned Oatmeal, which I sprinkle in nestboxes when kits are about 8 days old, to help them transition to solid food. How many salt licks to I have available? Are the nail clippers where they should be? Is there enough sunflower seed for the does due in 10 days? Is the extra bottle of apple cider vinegar nearby? I get two wood nest boxes from storage and stuff them full of straw and hay, since the does are starting to dig at the corner of their cages.

Bowls and cups and ceramic dishes that linger on counters get taken into the house to be washed. I return to the rabbitry, water glistening on the floor, mostly gone. Now it’s time to dump poop pans and slides and give them a rinse off. The rinsing is done on the grass, which is why I have a luxurious lawn. The poop goes straight into the garden compost bin, to nourish the parsley, strawberry, basil, kale, and carrot tops that I will feed the rabbits. Slides and pans are returned to the appropriate rabbits and now it’s time to wield the shop broom and sweep up the fallen straw, hay, and lingering poops on the floor. 

It’s time to assemble the Growout cage setup. The cage goes back into it’s slot in the Fortress of Rabbitude with three resting mats in it, the wooden shelf zip-tied to the back wire, two half-gallon waterers refilled and placed in their spots, the hay ring stuffed full and latched to the wire, the feeder filled to the top, the salt lick placed where the babies can stretch up and satistfy their cravings. All is ready to tranfer the six week old weaned rabbits to the next stage of their lives. 

It’s the Day After, a cycle that repeats itself every three months or so. There are weeds to be eaten, tree branches to nibble, rabbit shows to attend, with sunshine and breezes to be enjoyed. New rabbits are born and older ones make the journey to new homes.

It’s life in their rabbitry.

Blue Ribbon Rabbits

Blue Ribbon Rabbits

 

First and Second Place

 

End of Day Results

 

I will be the first to admit that when I started showing rabbits last year, I knew nothing about rabbit shows. Nada. Zip. Zero. I researched enough to know I needed to get there early, bring a chair, the rabbits, water for the rabbits, and a pen.

I arrived early and found a spot in the fairground barn (an exhibitor barn) by the big doors and set up my chair, claiming my area. There were six judging tables, each about 15 feet long, that covered one long side of the barn. Opposite the judging tables on the other side of the room was the check-in table and judging tables for guinea pigs. Other competitors were arriving through the big barn doors, bringing in what looked like pallets of rabbits on landscaping wagons. Rabbits of all types–big, small, fluffy, sleek, black, white, silver–all looking out of their rabbit carriers, drinking from tiny water bottles. Those folks set up in the middle of the barn and then walked over to the check-in table, handing over their required paperwork for the show.

Looking at the parade of professionals and their gleaming carriers and wagons, my heart sunk just a little bit. I headed out to my car and started to bring in my rabbits, all of them ensconced in small dog and cat carriers. Four trips back and forth to my car, the carriers in each hand stuffed with straw and hay that left a trail through the barn like bread crumbs, leading right to my spot.

I was the only person there that had cat carriers.

I went to the check-in table and was handed a small mountain of papers to fill out; a slip for each rabbit of my rabbits to fill out name, address, breed, age, sex, etc. Since this was a triple show, that meant I had to fill out 24 slips in addition to the main exhibitioner’s page which listed all my rabbits, tattoos, age, etc, all over again. Ever fill out all your basic information 25 times, maybe at the social security or welfare office? From the hand cramps after all the repetitious writing I felt entitled to some portion of WIC or SNAP!!

After filling out the paperwork and turning it in, I realized I needed a tattooist for my rabbits! I had put tattoo numbers for them on their paperwork (since a rabbit has to have an ear tattoo to be shown) but now I needed it to actually have it done. A visiting judge had a tattoo station set up by the check- in table and after paying her $2 per tattoo, I had to pick up all those cat carriers again and take them over to where she was set up. If you ever have to wrestle six young rabbits in and out of cat carriers full of straw, you will find to your growing embarassment that there will be a small mountain of stems on the floor and brand new cuts on your arms from struggling rabbit toenails when you’re done. I was hot and exhausted and judging hadn’t even started yet. Humping those carriers back to my spot (I bribed two young girls to help me) I settled into my chair for a rest. Just to have the first class for New Zealands called at the other end of the barn.

At this point there were probably 150 people and their rabbits in the barn and it was extremely crowded with walking area at a minimum. I grabbed two carriers (10 lbs of rabbit in each carrier) and made the long walk to the other end of the barn, and by my third trip I was the spectacle to watch at the NZ table. Once I got there, huffing and puffing, the judge was waiting for me to put my rabbits on the table in the little individual cages. A fellow competitor who was showing New Zealand Whites took one look at me and my set up and said, “First show? Everyone has cat carriers for their first couple shows. Let me help.” Another gentleman joined us in breaking out the rabbits a moment later. When the judge got huffy over the delay (those tables are high and difficult to see over) my rescuer said, “It’s her first show, please be patient.”

It turns out I was the only person with New Zealand Reds at that show and was competing against myself in all three classes. In retrospect I’m glad, I learned a lot about NZR conformation, show etiquette, and what the best breeding options I had for my next generation of Reds. Near the end of the show I traded one of my Red doelings for a genuine top-opening rabbit carrier, which enabled me to retire two cat carriers. I made some new friends and was proud of how well my rabbits and I did our first show out.

That evening as I packed up the car there was another trail of straw behind us but this time it led to blue ribbon rabbits.

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***If you’re going to show rabbits, here is some advice: 1. Eat breakfast and bring lunch, 2. Bring return address labels to apply to the show paperwork, it’ll cut down on the carpal tunnel from writing your info over and over, 3. BORROW/BUY/STEAL a wagon for moving your rabbits, 4. Do NOT bring open topped water bottles (Lixit brand for example), when you have to take them off the cages they spill water all over the ground since they can’t be set on their sides.

Are We Pregnant Yet?


Rabbits are supposed to breed, well, like rabbits, right?

Wrong.

Whomever coined that generalization apparently didn’t actually breed rabbits, he merely saw the results of successful matings. When rabbits don’t want to mate (a shocker, right?) it can be extremely frustrating to get them in the mood. Barry White, the Songmaster of Gettin’ It On, just doesn’t do it for lagomorphs. A variety of things may be tried (and successful, otherwise I wouldn’t list them) which includes long car rides, switching cages with the intended buck for a day or two, raspberry zinger tea, weight loss, attempted table breedings, or daily exposure to the buck for as long as you have the patience to do so. Guess which one may have finally worked with Meg?

Wheatley is outweighed by a couple pounds by Meg, and she has a tendancy to beat up bucks that annoy her, so all visitations were closely supervised. Unlike Wheatley’s encounters with my other does, there were no discernable successful fall offs, just a lot of exhausted panting and chasing his new big lady around, who refused to lift for him. However, a lack of lift and a lack of visible fall offs doesn’t necesarily mean that impregnantion wasn’t unattained. There have been many breeders who have had suprise litters after a “failed” mating.

So poor Wheatley literally wore the hair off his hind hocks over the course of five days last month. I didn’t realize he had sore and bleeding hocks til I put him back in his cage and realized I had blood on me. That’s why you’ll see his cage currently has loads of straw in it, to take the pressure off his feet while the protective foot hair grows back in. I applied Blu-Kote to his feet for about a week while the flesh healed clean. I’d say in another week or so, his feet will be back to normal.

Megan didn’t try to build a nest two weeks after her meet-ups with Wheatley, which for her is a sure sign of a false pregnancy. However, today she was hay-stashing and looking to build a nest!! This is great news since I’ve been trying to get her pregnant for almost a year. I had to switch some of the rabbit housing around to find a cage that fit her nest box through the door. As soon as she was settled into the new cage with the nest box, she went to work building a lovely tunnel and baby chamber. Now she has the pleased look of a rabbit with all her ducks in a row!

I am terrible at palpitating, and her “due” date is spread between April 10 – 15. With having to paint Wheatley’s feet with Blu-Kote, I’m tempted to give this litter (if there is one) a Pict naming theme.

Gartnach, anyone??

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